Norwegian invention in artificial intelligence attracts worldwide attention – NRK Sørlandet – Local news, TV and radio

Imagine a machine that could tell us quickly and with great accuracy whether people in a coma would survive.

Or how likely the cancer is to come back. The machine is there.

And if we are to believe the researchers, the possibilities are many and great for the so-called Tsetlin machine.

Chinese Li Jiao is an associate professor at UiA.  He believes Granmo's invention is a revolution in the ability of machines to learn.

Chinese Li Jiao is an associate professor at UiA. He believes Granmo’s invention is a revolution in the ability of machines to learn.

Photo: Pål Tegnander/NRK

– It is a revolution in artificial intelligence, and it belongs to Norway, says Chinese researcher Li Jiao enthusiastically.

He’s a fellow Grimstad man behind what could turn out to be a technological leap.

The man’s name is Ole-Christoffer Granmo, who is a professor at the University of Agder (UiA).

– It is very interesting, because there are a lot of incredibly good people who are involved in the research, says the inventor.

He brought with him as many as seven other researchers, just at UiA.

In addition, researchers around the world are beginning to use the technology.

– It is simply very exciting that all these talented people are involved in further research, he thinks.

Both the article and the source code are open online, for use by anyone who wants and can.

In countries such as the Netherlands, Canada, England, China, Switzerland and the United States, work is now underway on the Norwegian invention. Among other things.

In Switzerland and the USA, researchers used the power of machine thinking two years ago.

Professor Ole-Christoffer Granmo in front of the Tsetlin machine, which is located in a separate room at the University of Agder, Grimstad

Inventor: Professor Ole-Christoffer Granmo in front of the Tsetlin machine, which is located in a separate room at the University of Agder, Grimstad.

Photo: Pål Tegnander/NRK

Predicts chances of survival

Among other things, they tested the ability to predict patients’ chances of surviving in a coma.

“When the machine receives data from the brain activity of these patients, we can more accurately and quickly predict the chance of survival,” says Vladimir Zadorozhny of the University of Pittsburgh in the US.

He receives support from Bee’ah in Switzerland.

“The advantage is that the machine requires much less resources and energy than comparable technology,” says Christian Dallas Blakely of PricewaterhouseCoopers in Zurich.

Christian Dallas Blakely is Director of Artificial Intelligence at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Switzerland.

Christian Dallas Blakely is Director of Artificial Intelligence at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Switzerland.

Photo: PWC Switzerland

Researchers believe that it differs from all technologies on the market. The reason is that the machine provides logical knowledge about the data that can be easily understood.

allergy test

At Sørlandet Hospital, researchers Tor Oddbjørn Tveit and Geir Thore Berge tested the ability to report allergies before a patient was sedated.

They say the machine is promising, but it remains to be tried in other areas.

They think the most interesting thing is that the machine doesn’t just give an answer.

They also provide a rationale for the answer that humans can verify, they think.

Hospital operating room

Patients’ potential allergies related to the medications that will be used during surgery can be vital knowledge. The ability of the Tsetlin machine to detect this was investigated through patient records at Sørlandet Hospital. (This photo was taken in another hospital)

Photo: Gorm Kallestad / NTB scanpix

Historical comparison

Professor Vladimir Zadorozhny in Pittsburgh goes so far as to compare the Norwegian invention to what happened at the beginning of the American oil adventure.

Professor Vladimir I.  Zadorozhny

Professor Vladimir I. Zadorozhny that the Celine machine can be summed up in three words. Intelligent and continuous data cleansing.

Photo: University of Pittsburgh

When the United States began refining crude oil in the late 19th century, people could buy kerosene and gasoline, to name a few. This ultimately changed the entire community.

In the same way, it is believed that Granmo’s invention can affect our lives.

I believe a machine can help us process data to a level that can be used smoothly and efficiently in every area of ​​our lives.

He thinks it’s easy to understand and explain the logic behind the machine selection in one piece.

– Zadorozhny believes that this is very important when interpreting such large amounts of complex data.

Zadorochny and other researchers tested the machine’s ability to predict the risks of social unrest.

The data placed in the device was the number of known violations of basic human rights.

Hong Kong students demonstrate outside the National Assembly of Taiwan in Taipei on October 1, 2021.

The Tsetlin machine can predict such social upheavals. Here, students demonstrate outside the National Assembly of Taiwan in 2021.

Photo: Johnson Lai/AP

Surgical intervention in the operating room at St.  Olavs in Trondheim

Surgical procedures require careful knowledge of the patient’s sensitivity. Researchers investigated the ability of a Tsetlin machine to detect potential drug allergies in a patient’s medical record (illustration image).

Photo: Gorm Kallestad / NTB scanpix

Illustrative image of a nurse with a comatose patient

In Pittsburgh, USA, researchers, among other things, investigated the ability of the Tsetlin machine to predict patients’ survival in a coma by analyzing brain activity (illustration image).

The method of Mikhail Tsetlin

The machine is based on the experiments of a Russian mathematician and physicist named Mikhail Tsetlin.

Portrait of Mikhail Lvovich Tsetlin, Russian mathematician and physicist.

A researcher in the former Soviet Union, Mikhail Lvovich Tsetlin, gave the name to the Tsetlin machine, which is expected to have a significant spread in machine learning.

Among other things, he studied the methods of training mice.

Granmo imparted the same principles to machine training.

The goal is to teach them the best procedures in unfamiliar and diverse environments, he says.

New things can be solved

Granmo says the use is virtually unlimited, because the algorithm can learn to solve new tasks.

We were also able to increase the speed of actual machine learning by 50 times, he says.

According to Granmo, this means that they can handle a larger amount of data. We can get answers in minutes and hours instead of days and weeks.

– Thus, we can solve much greater challenges than before, he believes.

Outside his office, Professor Ole-Christoffer Granmo holds a poster detailing the historical background and principles of the Tsetlin machine.

Outside his office, Professor Ole-Christoffer Granmo holds a poster detailing the historical background and principles of the Tsetlin machine.

Photo: Pål Tegnander/NRK

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.