fucking mas? | Finansavisen

Thank you for reviewing the Finansavisen editorial 6.5.22, with the NHO Transport website in Aftenposten describing 4.5.22 as a “ridiculous rant against electric cars”. It’s a political goal to get more people to travel by public transport, and driving an electric car couldn’t be cheaper than driving a bus in Oslo. Ergo, electric car drivers have to pay more when they drive in the city. It’s hard to understand that this must be ridiculous or meaningless.

The lead writer responds to the account. He is, of course, right that driving a bus is still cheaper than driving an electric car if you include depreciation, wear and tear and car insurance.

However, the title of the post in Aftenposten was “Leave the electric car in the garage.” This presupposes that the electric vehicle has already been purchased and that the owner has taken into account insurance, depreciation or loss of value and service and tire wear.

What influences people’s travel habits, is the crucial question. The lead writer touches upon this by claiming that “[there are]perhaps some marginal cost considerations…”.

Maybe that’s the point. If you have already purchased an electric car, you will not think much about loss of value, insurance or tire wear when you have to choose public transportation or your private car in everyday life. Then only variable costs related to toll rates, energy consumption and the number of parking spaces.

The proportion of public transport in Oslo and Akershus is about 20 percent Below the level recorded in 2019, but car traffic is 3-4 percent higher. And that’s not because walking, riding a bike, or traveling by public transportation has become more difficult than before, the lead writer believes.

On the other hand, travel habits have changed after two years with a strong urge not to travel by public transport. In addition, there was a record sale of electric cars. If we want to get back on the good public transport path, electric car drivers must also pay the costs that car use imposes on society.

Norway’s expensive electric car policy. In the 2022 state budget, the Ministry of Finance estimated that the current policy is costing society 30 billion in lost tax revenue each year. This money could have been used for completely different welfare measures, which benefit the less resourceful groups of electric car owners today.

If we are to reach the “zero growth target” of traffic in and out of cities, more people must travel together. To achieve this, public transport must be strengthened and thus made more competitive.

Geoffrey Lund, Head of Business Policy, NHO Transport Photo: Moment Studio

John H. Sturdang, CEO of NHO Transport. Photo: NTB

Geoffrey Lundy

Head of Business Policy, NHO Transport

John H. sturdang

CEO of NHO Transport

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